Combine theory and practice: betting on the integration strategy

Published on by Martí Puig (author)

"Journalists have been promoters of the democracy. Now they are becoming cosmonauts in technical capsules. Put them back in the cafés and bars and let them work in the rain". For Professor Jacques Guyot the formula is simple: it should be resumed contact with citizens and it should be improved the teaching to the students in order to allow them to be well related with technical aspects of the profession.

Professor Jacques Guyot, who has a PhD in Information Sciences and Commnication at the Université of Rennes II, teaches at Université de Paris and is the director of Center for Media Studies, Technology and Internationalization, is an authority in this sector.

"Journalists were a kind of heroes during the last century", recalls professor Guyot. A kind of miths. The medias were the element that helped people to identify themselves with society. It's because of that mitology that students wanted and want even today to become journalists. Journalism must regain its reputation.

It will not be possible if the profession is not suited to modern times. Journalists, someday, ceased to be involved in the technical innovations of the profession, which were delegated to others. They have been responsible for too long just to inform, without thinking of new ways to communicate. "This disconnection existed and is no longer possible. It has to be changed", says Guyot.

It was difficult to introduce journalism in academic world. It was seen even with contempt: spies, intruders, those of the gossip... Finally these obstacles were overcome. Today in communication faculties are working journalists, researchers and teachers without journalistic studies. Now is necessary to combine theoretical teaching with practice. "The supposed rivalry between intellectuality and technicity must be overcome. We must go for the integration strategy". This is the opinion of Professor Guyot. It must be heard.

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